Mockingjay or, Crazy Bread

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4 comments for “Mockingjay or, Crazy Bread

  1. Cory
    September 9, 2010 at 1:40 am

    Really enjoyed the thoughtful analysis of Mockingjay. I read it over the Labor Day weekend and, though I was more satisfied than some of you, I thought that you raised some valid questions about the plot.

    Where did the pearl go?

    Did Collins allow politics to rule her story?

    Wish I could answer the first question, but to the second, I will add my opinion. Writers, like all artists, are going to project their views onto their work. If someone feels strongly about something, that will come through. One thing I love about Suzanne Collins’ work is that she creates a real picture of war and its horrors. I did not know that her father was a veteran, but this seems to explain her paradigm to me.

    I feel that her ending was as hopeful as it could have possibly been. She seems to have a consistent theme not of war’s irreparable damage, but of the irrevocable changes it creates in those who see it. The fact that there is some chance for recovery, shown through District 12, Peeta, and even Katniss, gave me hope as the reader.

    Thanks again for the scintillating commentary.

  2. Karl
    September 9, 2010 at 1:02 pm

    Hey, I can totally be a fangirl. You should hear me talk about Graceling! Glad you enjoyed the podcast, and we really appreciate your feedback. Tell your friends. 🙂

  3. Emily
    October 22, 2010 at 9:16 am

    Karl recommended Graceling to me and I loved it so hard. My only beef with it is that the sequel didn’t deal with Katsa at all. Bummer.

  4. adrienne
    October 26, 2010 at 11:12 am

    I enjoyed Graceling and Fire. I wasn’t so bothered that it didn’t have Katsa in the sequel. It was a little disconcerting because that’s what I’m used to. I’m really interested in how she is planning to end the series. My ideal book would be a inclusion of both women, but I’m probably dreaming…

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